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Upright MRI Stand-Up, "High Field", OPEN MRI
OPEN MRI
Multi-Slice CT
Intervention & Pain Management
X-ray & Fluoroscopy
Ultrasound
Accepted Insurance Providers
Care Credit


Upright MRI (TruSCAN MRI) Stand-Up, "High Field", OPEN MRI
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Q: What's the difference between the Upright MRI (TruSCAN MRI) Stand-up, "High Field", Open MRI and other MRI's?
A: There are several differences. Perhaps the most important is that while all other MRI machines scan the patient when they are lying down or recumbent, our MRI actually allows you to sit or stand for your study. Often a "weight bearing" MRI is the only position in which the patient's symptoms occur.

Also, due to the design of the Upright MRI Stand-up, we can image patients in a variety of positions, referred to as positional MRI or pMRI, that are not possible in other MRIs. These positions include flexion, extension and rotation.

Most open MRI's are considered "low field", having a magnet strength of .23T or .3 Tesla. Our "high field" magnet is a .6T strength which assists us in securing quality images in this unique, non-claustrophobic setting.

Q: I've been claustrophobic in other machines, how "Open" is this one?
A: Our new Upright MRI (TruSCAN MRI) Stand-up allows you to sit or stand and watch a TV monitor mounted on the wall in the exam room. There are no obstacles to make you feel confined. If your doctor orders an MRI in a recumbent position (lying down), the ceiling of the room is the only thing over your head.

Q: Are there any special preparations or restrictions?
A: You only need to prepare for an MRI if you are having IV sedation or contrast (dye), in which case you should not eat for several hours prior to your exam. Rose Radiology Center, Inc. (RRC) staff will provide you with specific instructions at the time you schedule your appointment.

Q: Why is it important to remove any metallic objects before I enter the MRI room?
A: You'll need to remove all metal objects for safety reasons and because they can cause artifacts to appear on the MRI image.

Q: Will there be any problems if I have had surgery in which metal has been implanted?
A: As a rule, no. However, please be sure to notify our technologist of any prior surgeries before your exam. Patients with pacemakers or certain types of aneurysm clips should not have an MRI.

Q: Is there any risk?
A: MRI is a very safe diagnostic procedure. There have been no health risks associated with the magnetic field or the radio waves used by the machine.


OPEN MRI
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Q: What is the difference between an MRI and a CT?
A: Unlike CT, MRI does not use radiation. Instead, MRI creates high-quality images through the combination of a magnetic field and radio waves. MRI is much more sensitive to the imaging of the soft tissues of the body than CT.

Q: What's the difference between an "OPEN" MRI and a "tube" type MRI?
A: Some patients feel high levels of anxiety when subjected to the confining space of tube-type MRI's. Our OPEN MRI has an unobstructed view from three sides, allowing you to see and talk to our technologist during your exam. Our "open" scanner provides for a higher level of comfort over conventional, "tube shaped" MRI machines.

Q: What body parts can the MRI scanner evaluate?
A: Physicians use the MRI exam to evaluate one part of the body at a time. The MRI can take images of the head and brain, neck, back, abdomen, pelvis, shoulder, knee, ankle foot, blood vessels (MRA) and more.

Q: Are there any special preparations or restrictions?
A: You only need to prepare for an MRI if you are having IV sedation or contrast (dye), in which case you should not eat for several hours prior to your exam. Rose Radiology Center, Inc. (RRC) staff will provide you with specific instructions at the time you schedule your appointment.

Q: Why is it important to remove any metallic objects before I enter the MRI room?
A: You'll need to remove all metal objects for safety reasons and because they can cause artifacts to appear on the MRI image.

Q: Will there be any problems if I have had surgery in which metal has been implanted?
A: As a rule, no. However, please be sure to notify our technologist of any prior surgeries before your exam. Patients with pacemakers or certain types of aneurysm clips should not have an MRI.

Q: Is there any risk?
A: MRI is a very safe diagnostic procedure. There have been no health risks associated with the magnetic field or the radio waves used by the machine.

Q: Can I get an MRI if I am pregnant or breastfeeding?
A: While an MRI scan has no known side effects, it is not recommended for pregnant women unless it is medically indicated. If you are breastfeeding and have contrast as part of your exam, please suspend nursing for 24 hours after your exam.

Q: Why is the scanner so noisy?
A: The MRI scanner works with strong magnetic fields that build up energy. The energy is released as loud knocking sounds. Our technologist will offer you a set of ear plugs to make your exam more comfortable.


Multi-Slice CT
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Q: How long does the CT exam require?
A: A CT scan requires that you relax and lie still for 10 to 30 minutes per exam. If contrast is given or multiple exams are performed, more time will be needed.

Q: Will I have to change my clothes?
A: We recommend that you wear comfortable clothes. However, our technologist will provide you with pants and a top to change into.

Q: Are there any special preparations / restrictions?
A: If your exam requires a contrast to be used, please do not eat anything for 3 to 4 hours prior to your exam. Exams requiring contrast material include studies of the head, soft tissue, neck, chest abdomen and pelvis.

Q: Can I have a CT when I am breastfeeding?
A: If you are breastfeeding and have contrast as part of your exam, please suspend nursing for 24 hours after your exam.

Q: Can I take my prescribed medication?
A: Yes, for any CT exam, you may continue taking your prescribed medication(s). However, if you are a diabetic taking Glucophage, you should stop taking this medication for 48 hours after any contrast procedure.

Q: How will I feel after the exam?
A: In most cases, you can resume normal activity immediately.


Intervention & Pain Management
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Q: How long will the exam take?
A: Each injection usually requires 30 to 60 minutes.

Q: Will I need to change clothes for the exam?
A: Yes, our technologists will provide you with appropriate gowns when you arrive at our facility.

Q: Will the procedure be painful?
A: Some exams are designed to relieve pain, while others are done to reduce your symptoms for diagnostic purposes. Because Rose Radiology Center, Inc. (RRC) radiologists are very experienced and skilled; they perform the procedure quickly and accurately, minimizing your discomfort.

Q: Can a family member or friend come with me during the procedure?
A: Unless there are unique circumstances, we do not allow family or friends in the exam rooms so that the radiologist and technologist can focus all their attention on you.

Q: What are the most common medications used for injections?
A: Lidocaine and Marcaine, local anesthetics, and Celestone Soluspan or Depomedrol, a water-soluble steroid, are the most often used medications for therapeutic injections.

Q: Will I need someone to drive me there and back?
A: Your reflexes may be temporarily impaired from the exam or you may experience numbness around the injection site, so you will want to arrange for a driver as a safety precaution. RRC will not perform the exam unless you have a driver with you.

Q: Can I go right back to work after my procedure?
A: For most procedures you will be able to return to work if you choose, however, there are a few examinations that may require you to miss work. Please ask the RRC staff when you make your appointment.

Q: If I experience pain after my procedure, what can I do?
A: Generally the pain is temporary and responds to typical analgesics. You may continue to take your prescribed pain medication until you obtain relief.

Q: What kind of relief can I expect from the injected medication and how long will it last?
A: The amount and length of relief varies by patient and procedure. If the injection reaches the source of your pain, you are likely to experience improvement by 2 to 5 days after the procedure.

Q: What happens if the injection fails to relieve my pain? Is it a waste of time?
A: Whether the injection relieves your symptoms or not, your physician will gather valuable data on the source and nature of your pain. If you experience no relief, your doctor may use the process of elimination to move on to the next most likely source of distress. Sometimes it requires several injections to achieve the relief you desire.


X-ray & Fluoroscopy
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Q: Are x-rays safe?
A: Very low radiation dosage in x-ray, as well as Spiral CT scans and fluoroscopy, make them extremely safe as diagnostic procedures.

Q: Are any special preparation / restrictions for an x-ray exam?
A: Should your exam require a contrast, some prep may be required. Our staff will inform you if prep is required when you schedule your appointment.


Ultrasound
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Q: Why do I need a full bladder for a pelvic Ultrasound?
A: Sound waves travel more easily through liquids than through surrounding tissues and air. Consequently, a full bladder facilitates passage of sound waves through it, making the uterus and ovaries behind the bladder easier to see.

Q: Why can't I eat or drink anything before my abdominal ultrasound?
A: When you eat, drink, or even chew gum, you introduce air into the stomach and bowel. Sound waves do not penetrate air, making it harder to see the target organs. Food can also make your gall bladder contract, making it harder to image.

Q: If there are ulcers in my stomach, can the ultrasound see them?
A: No.

Q: Can ultrasound be harmful to my unborn baby?
A: To date, there have been no proven ill effects from conducting regular ultrasound exams on pregnant women.


Accepted Insurance Providers
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Rose Radiology Centers, Inc. is a participating provider for the following insurance plans:

AETNA
ALLRAD DIRECT
AMERIGROUP (ALL PLANS)
ANCICARE
AVMED
BCBS BLUE OPTIONS
BEECHSTREET CORPORATION –
with over 500 insurance companies through the Beechstreet Network such as BENESIGHT OR CORESOURCE be sure to check beechstreet.com to see if your plan is covered under the Beechstreet Corporation
BLUE CROSS/BLUE SHIELD FLORIDA
CARE IQ/CORVEL
CAREPLUS
CCN/FIRST HEALTH
CHOICE MEDICAL MANAGEMENT
CIGNA
CITRUS HEALTH CARE
COAST2COAST DIAGNOSTICS
CONFIDENT HEALTH CARE
CONSERVECARE
COVENTRY
CYPRESS CARE
DELTA MEDICAL INC.
EVERCARE
EVOLUTIONS HEALTHCARE SYSTEM – COMMERCIAL & WORKERS COMP
FCDIGNOSTIC
FIRST HEALTH/CCN
FL BREAST AND CERVICAL CANCER PROGRAM
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
FLORIDA HEALTH SOLUTION
FLORIDA HEALTHCARE PLUS
FREEDOM HEALTH
GALAXY HEALTH NETWORKS
GHI
HEALTH ADVANTAGE NETWORK dba MEDNET
HEALTH OPTIONS
HEALTHEASE
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY INSURANCE
HUMANA GOLD PLUS (EAST PASCO LOCATION ONLY)
HUMANA HEALTH CARE (ALL PLANS EXCEPT MEDICARE ADVANTAGE AND GOLD PLUS HMO)
HUMANA VETERANS (UPRIGHT MRI ONLY)
INTEGRAL QUALITY CARE
JOHNSTON & ASSOCIATES
MCM MAXCARE
MD MEDICARE CHOICE (FOMERLY PARTNER CARE)
MED OPTIONS
MEDFOCUS
MEDICAID/CONSULTEC
MEDICARE
MEDSOLUTIONS
MEDWEST
METCARE/ADVANTAGE CARE
MIDWEST DIAGNOSTIC MANAGEMENT –
COMMERCIAL & WORKERS COMP
MOLINA HEALTHCARE
MULTIPLAN
NETWORKS B & C
ONECALL MEDICAL
OPTIMUM
ORCHID MEDICAL
PASCO CO. SCHOOL BOARD INS.
PHCS
PHYSICIANS UNITED PLAN (PUP)
PINELLAS COUNTY HEALTH PLAN

PREFERRED CARE PARTNERS (HILLSBOROUGH, MANATEE, PINELLAS COUNTIES)
PRESTIGE
PROGRESSIVE MEDICAL MANAGEMENT
QUALITY HEALTH PLANS (QHP)
RAILROAD MEDICARE
RAYTELL IMAGING NETWORK
SIMPLY HEALTHCARE
SOUTHCARE PPO
STAYWELL/HEALTHY KIDS
STREAMLINE IMAGING
SUNSHINE STATE HEALTH PLAN
TODAY'S OPTIONS (FORMERLY PYRAMID)
TRICARE/CHAMPUS
UNITED HEALTHCARE
UNIVERSAL HEALTHCARE
US DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
US IMAGING
USA MANAGED CARE ORGANIZATION
VOCATIONAL REHAB – STATE OF FLORIDA
WELLCARE-STAYWELL
TECH HEALTH

WE ALSO ACCEPT AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE AND ATTORNEY’S LETTERS OF PROTECTION.

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